Residents urged to ask questions to get answers

By PHIL OWEN*

WHY don’t I have a footpath? 

This is a question I often receive in my capacity as a Brighton councillor and the answer is one that many ratepayers have difficulty accepting.  

When Old Beach was first subdivided in the 1960s for example, there were next to no subdivision requirements other than for a gravel road. Blocks were cheap but came without reticulated water, footpaths, sewer, stormwater, kerbs or gutters.

Some houses began to be built on the Old Beach blocks and by the 1980s when no more than 20 houses had been built, the septic tanks became a major problem.  

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Police urge caution in road and bike behaviour

By JARED FAWKNER*

BRIDGEWATER Police has noticed a reduction in vehicle and pedestrian traffic within the last few months due to COVID-19 restrictions. However, as restrictions ease vehicle and pedestrian traffic is becoming more prevalent on our roads. There have already been complaints about driver behaviour at Brighton Primary School and within the Brighton community generally, particularly parents double parking outside the school.

Jared Fawkner is acting sergeant of Bridgewater Police.
Jared Fawkner is acting sergeant of Bridgewater Police.

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School makes space for woodcraft

BRIGHTON Primary students will enjoy an exciting new learning opportunity beginning in Term 3. The school recently bought a shipping container to house its Maker Space program focusing on woodcraft projects. The Maker Space program will allow students to apply classroom maths, reading and writing, learning to design as well as creating personal interest projects.

Brighton Primary Year five to six students, from left, Felix Williams, Mason Thompson, Milly Holmes and Elise Smith.
Brighton Primary Year five to six students, from left, Felix Williams, Mason Thompson, Milly Holmes and Elise Smith.

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Carbon reduction encourages a healthier community

BRIGHTON Council and Spring Bay Mill have collaborated with Hobart Airport to plant 1000 native trees and bushes at Polonia Bridge Park to create a native ecosystem and habitat on the banks of the Jordan River.

The Brighton tree planting project is one of Hobart Airport’s airport carbon reduction initiatives. The airport is planting a tree a day in Tasmania for 2020 plus a further 29 trees because this year is a leap year.

The project is creating a native ecosystem and habitat on the banks of the Jordan River.
The project is creating a native ecosystem and habitat on the banks of the Jordan River.

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New Brighton education projects move forward

 

WORK on the highly-anticipated Brighton High School is progressing, with the Tasmanian Government advancing plans for the state-of-the-art education facilities for future generations of learners.

“The construction of a new high school is a highly anticipated project for the fast-growing community of Brighton, catering for this growth by providing state-of-the-art education facilities for future generations of learners is a priority for our Government,” said Minister for Education Jeremy Rockliff.

Brighton Mayor Tony Foster with Minister for Education Jeremy Rockliff review the concept plans for the High School.
Brighton Mayor Tony Foster with Minister for Education Jeremy Rockliff review the concept plans for the High School.

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Next step in Bridgewater Bridge project

THE State Government has released approved design requirements for the replacement Bridgewater Bridge, a positive sign of progress for this important infrastructure project.

Infrastructure and Transport Minister Michael Ferguson said the eight design requirements were broadly consistent with those determined through previous community consultation and engagement with Infrastructure Australia, and include the number of traffic lanes, road height and the inclusion of pedestrian and cycle facilities.

It was previously thought the design requirements may need to be substantially reduced in order to achieve the project budget, however, a range of possible bridge designs are capable of meeting the requirements and two high-level concept designs have been released.

One of the new Bridgewater Bridge concepts
One of the new Bridgewater Bridge concepts

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Major developments significant lift for Brighton

By TONY FOSTER*

THE Brighton Municipality received a positive boost in July with further confirmation of three highly-anticipated, much-needed and welcomed major developments – the replacement Bridgewater Bridge, the new Brighton High School and the upgrading of the Jordan River Learning Centre School Farm.

Each of these projects is strongly supported by Brighton Council and individually and collectively they will provide a significant lift to our local economy and social fabric.

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Regions to benefit from workforce planning project

FOUR southern Tasmanian councils have received almost $400,000 in funding to improve their regions’ employment options. The three-year grant from the Tasmanian Community Fund is primarily for the appointment of a workforce development coordinator whose job will be to more clearly align job seekers with the needs of potential regional employers.

The councils working together are the sub-regional group consisting of the Brighton, Central Highlands, Derwent Valley and Southern Midlands Councils. The councils have worked together successfully as a group on a range of projects for the past 15 years.

Chair of the sub-regional group, Brighton Council’s James Dryburgh said the grant success would result in the creation of additional and better jobs for people in the regions.

Chair of the sub-region group James Dryburgh
Chair of the sub-regional group James Dryburgh

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COVID-19 puts no brake on Brighton development activity

 WHILE the COVID-19 emergency may have slowed economic activity in Australia and globally, it has not impacted on growth and development in Brighton Municipality.

In fact, the reverse is the case with a record number of development applications, mainly for new dwellings, approved by Brighton Council in the three months up to May 2020, with a total value of more than $18 million.

Taylor Crescent development
Taylor Crescent Neighbourhood development

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College courses a pathway to university

By SHARON REIBEL*

CHOOSING the right subjects for Years 11 and 12 has never been easier.

‘Step into your future’ is Claremont College’s key message for students as they approach senior secondary education. To ensure students can make informed decisions about their courses in years 11 and 12, Claremont College has developed a new online course and enrolment information space on its website.

Apart from the many subjects on offer, the site highlights opportunities available to students if they choose to study a particular course. This may be working in the college’s highly regarded music program with tutors who are experienced performers, or the chance to perform in one of the college bands at MONA.

• Claremont College uniHUB co-coordinator Dr Jo Ingram assists a student with information about the University of Tasmania.
• Claremont College uniHUB co-coordinator Dr Jo Ingram assists a student with information about the University of Tasmania.

The online guide has profiles of alumni who have gone on to complete apprenticeships, university degrees or excel in research or sport.

Information on the uniHUB on the college campus, the only one in southern Tasmania, is available in the new online guide allowing  students to access UTAS. Students can get advice and assistance on pathways to university study, as well as study support and advice.

A careers centre assists students determining pathways, accessing career and job information, writing applications and resumes, and interview practice. They can be accessed virtually by students currently at college and those planning their Year 11 program in 2021.

The new Claremont College Academic pathways program mentors and supports students on a university pathway. It inspires students to aim high, through community engagement and a series of targeted activities, as well as builds confidence and develops strategies for successful academic study.

Claremont College has an excellent Vocational Education and Training (VET) program managed by experienced staff with long-standing employer networks.  Claremont was the first college to offer Electrotechnology VET in Tasmania and the first in Australia to offer the Australian Defence Forces (ADF) VET program, which is in its 15th year providing a direct pathway into the ADF for many graduates. Certificate II in animal studies, introduced this year, can provide a pathway to work and/or study in the animal care and management industry such as veterinary nursing,

The College offers a number of specific industry-focused Tasmanian Assessment Standards and Certification courses supported by new facilities and equipment. In the agricultural enterprise class, students can run their own real-life agricultural enterprises, including seedling production, egg production and the raising of chickens and piglets. The media production class uses a fully equipped studio with a green screen and drone, and the digital art class works with industry-standard software, including Cinema 4D. Examples of the work undertaken in these classes can be seen in the new course guide.

For more information go to https://claremontcollege.education.tas.edu.au/

*Sharon Reibel is assistant principal of Claremont College