Council to consider organic waste changes

Brighton Council is planning to introduce a FOGO (Food Organic Garden Organics) service in 2021 but it will be seeking ratepayers’ thoughts before proceeding.

A potential FOGO service will mean third bin that is only for food scraps and garden waste and most likely collected on a fortnightly basis.

BRIGHTON Council is planning to introduce a FOGO (Food Organic Garden Organics) service in 2021 but it will be seeking ratepayers’ thoughts before proceeding.

A potential FOGO service will mean third bin that is only for food scraps and garden waste and most likely collected on a fortnightly basis.

This month Council will be conducting community consultation in the ‘Have Your Say’ section on the Council’s website. Residents who can’t access the survey online can request a survey by phone or in person at the Council offices.  

Brighton’s general manager James Dryburgh said a number of Tasmanian councils now offered a FOGO service. 

“As a Council will be making sure we learn from other councils’ experiences as we progress,” Mr Drburgh said.

Household food waste is the largest source of food waste in Australia and a major focus for governments.  When food and garden waste rots in landfill it creates harmful greenhouse gases, takes up space and requires more and bigger landfills.

Food and garden waste collected by FOGO is turned into compost and used to improve the soil health of Tasmania’s gardens and farms. 

When FOGO waste is taken out of landfills, space is saved for all the garbage that can’t be recycled and there is a significant drop in the volume of greenhouse gases produced. 

Apart from doing the right thing for the environment, FOGO is an easy and convenient way to get rid of food and garden waste.  It will cut down the need to take garden waste to the waste transfer station and it’s a shortcut for those who can’t or aren’t sure about composting at home.

State and Federal legislation relating to waste levies on landfills are expected in the future.  FOGO reduces the amount of waste going to landfill and will help save all ratepayers future landfill increases in costs.

Mr Dryburgh said the residents’ survey will shape Brighton FOGO service as well as help design information sessions Council will provide the community.

“The FOGO community survey link will be shared on Council’s Facebook page, Brighton Council’s website and Brighton Community News. We will be asking residents to give us their views so we can make the right decisions on their behalf.”

Mr Dryburgh said FOGO services would not be free. There will be a cost involved in introducing the service.

“We are still looking into exactly what our service will cost and how it will work for us to best suit the needs of our residents and ratepayers. Importantly though it is the most effective way to dispose of organic waste while considering the limitations of landfill and importantly the impact on our environment,” he said.

2 thoughts on “Council to consider organic waste changes”

  1. Would definitely love to have FOGO. We have no way of getting green waste (lawn clippings, vegetable scraps and garden waste) to the waste transfer at Bridgewater. If this isn’t feasible perhaps free access or a reduced fee at the waste station. Hope there is a good outcome.

  2. FOGO seems to be a very good option and a move in the right direction.The Brighton Council over the years have been very focused examples of this are first to have waste transfer station , kerbside garbage collection. equitable rating system.
    I am confident that in consultation with rate payers the correct decisions will be made and moving forward all rate payers will benefit from the changes.

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