Sale trail puts used in fashion

This year’s Garage Sale Trail is part of Brighton Council’s commitment to reducing landfill and supporting residents to reuse and reduce waste at home. The program is supported by more than 115 councils across Australia. Sellers can also set up virtual garage sales as an alternative to garage sales in local neighbourhoods.

BRIGHTON Municipality households, schools, community groups and local businesses are set to join more than 400,000 people across the country on Saturday 21 and Sunday 22 November as part of the tenth annual Garage Sale Trail, which will also be taking place online for the first time. 

Garage Sale Trail is part of Brighton Council’s commitment to reducing landfill and supporting residents to reuse and reduce waste at home. The program is supported by more than 115 councils across Australia. And for the first time ever sellers can also set up virtual garage sales as an alternative to garage sales in local neighbourhoods. 

The Garage Sale Trail is a great opportunity for people to connect with their community, have lots of fun and make some extra money at a time where many people need it most. 

Mayor Tony Foster said the Garage Sale Trail was a great opportunity for people to connect with their community, have lots of fun and make some extra money at a time where many people need it most. 

Continue reading “Sale trail puts used in fashion”

Pandemic pauses seniors school

Because of the pandemic, meetings for Bridgewater’a School for Seniors have been on hold since physical distancing was introduced in March. Currently it does not seem this will change any time in the immediate future.

By SHIRLEY MCKERROW*

BECAUSE of the pandemic, meetings for School for Seniors have been on hold since physical distancing was introduced in March. Currently it does not seem this will change any time in the immediate future.

I am sure that a lot of our members are suffering from withdrawal symptoms as we miss the socialising and our generous speakers every week.

As a designated at-risk group, we cannot take chances with the health of members or of our speakers by coming together too soon in an enclosed space for two hours.

Also , if we did meet with a limited numbers of members, I would be reluctant to ask speakers to spend their time and resources travelling to speak to half our group. There wouldn’t be the same atmosphere or interaction.

Schools for Seniors meetings have been on hold in Brighton Municipality since March.
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The wonder of science explored during library visit

Svenja Halfter and Dipon Sarkar shared a never-ending sense of joy and wonder about science with Library staff.

BRIDGEWATER Library had a visit from two volunteers from the Young Tassie Scientists (YTS) program as part of National Science Week 2020 last month. 

YTS which promotes the profile of science and engineering to students and the public provides insights into working as a scientist or an engineer. Participants in the YTS program volunteer their time to share a passion for science and a sense of wonder with people across the state.

Svenja Halfter and Dipon Sarkar shared a never-ending sense of joy and wonder about science with Library staff. 

The experiments they performed focused on the deep blue ocean and highlighted how science plays a part in climate change and the environment.  

Svenja and Dipon entered the makeshift laboratory at Bridgewater Library and eagerly reached into their Cool Science at Home packs to begin experimenting. The flurry of activity and laughter was caught on camera and is available on the Bridgewater Library Facebook page. 

Svenja Halfter and Dipon Sarkar shared a never-ending sense of joy and wonder about science with Library staff. 
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Children help celebrate national tree planting day

For Brighton Family Day Care the celebration of National Tree Day symbolised their strong links to the community and highlighted the importance of collaborative partnerships with many stakeholders within our community.

BRIGHTON Family Day Care recently organised a tree planting event to celebrate national tree planting day.

Educators, children and Family Day Care staff came together with Brighton Council at Bridgewater Parkland to plant a eucalyptus maculata which was donated by Council.

National Tree Day was co-founded in 1996 by Planet Ark and Olivia Newton-John. It is an opportunity for everyone in Australia to get their hands dirty and give back to the environment and there were plenty of enthusiastic little helpers on hand at Bridgewater Parkland to get their hands dirty.

For Brighton Family Day Care the celebration of National Tree Day symbolised their strong links to the community and highlighted the importance of collaborative partnerships with many stakeholders within our community.

Deputy Mayor Barbara Curran attended the event as the official representative of Council.

Deputy Mayor Barbara Curran and Council’s horticulturist Tim Pursell with Brighton Family Day Care educators and excited and enthusiastic children who planted the tree donated by Brighton Council.

Cr Curran has a strong connection to Brighton Family Day Care as a former educator over many years and understands the importance of activities such as this for children’s play as well as children learning about the importance of trees and nature from an early age.

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Industry turns experiment into experience

JRLF Senior School wants to partner with Nyrstar to have Dr Emma Eaton (second from right front row) become the school’s STEM ambassador. The school is trying to emphasise the value of aspiration with learners and wants to followup this recent visit with an industry tour of Nyrstar before the end of term.

NYRSTAR Hobart recently donated lab equipment to the Jordan River Learning Federation (JRLF) Senior School to help students engage with science subjects and to ensure excess equipment is put to valuable re-use in a school environment.

Rather than just deliver the equipment, Nyrstar employees visited the school to observe and assist students conduct a lab experiment as a fun classroom activity. The students participated in a small competition based on a titration experiment dubbed the ‘Titration Off’ on the day.

• Dr Emma Eaton, second from right front row, and Heather Waugh with Year 7 science students, second from left back row.
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College courses a pathway to university

By SHARON REIBEL*

CHOOSING the right subjects for Years 11 and 12 has never been easier.

‘Step into your future’ is Claremont College’s key message for students as they approach senior secondary education. To ensure students can make informed decisions about their courses in years 11 and 12, Claremont College has developed a new online course and enrolment information space on its website.

Apart from the many subjects on offer, the site highlights opportunities available to students if they choose to study a particular course. This may be working in the college’s highly regarded music program with tutors who are experienced performers, or the chance to perform in one of the college bands at MONA.

• Claremont College uniHUB co-coordinator Dr Jo Ingram assists a student with information about the University of Tasmania.
• Claremont College uniHUB co-coordinator Dr Jo Ingram assists a student with information about the University of Tasmania.

The online guide has profiles of alumni who have gone on to complete apprenticeships, university degrees or excel in research or sport.

Information on the uniHUB on the college campus, the only one in southern Tasmania, is available in the new online guide allowing  students to access UTAS. Students can get advice and assistance on pathways to university study, as well as study support and advice.

A careers centre assists students determining pathways, accessing career and job information, writing applications and resumes, and interview practice. They can be accessed virtually by students currently at college and those planning their Year 11 program in 2021.

The new Claremont College Academic pathways program mentors and supports students on a university pathway. It inspires students to aim high, through community engagement and a series of targeted activities, as well as builds confidence and develops strategies for successful academic study.

Claremont College has an excellent Vocational Education and Training (VET) program managed by experienced staff with long-standing employer networks.  Claremont was the first college to offer Electrotechnology VET in Tasmania and the first in Australia to offer the Australian Defence Forces (ADF) VET program, which is in its 15th year providing a direct pathway into the ADF for many graduates. Certificate II in animal studies, introduced this year, can provide a pathway to work and/or study in the animal care and management industry such as veterinary nursing,

The College offers a number of specific industry-focused Tasmanian Assessment Standards and Certification courses supported by new facilities and equipment. In the agricultural enterprise class, students can run their own real-life agricultural enterprises, including seedling production, egg production and the raising of chickens and piglets. The media production class uses a fully equipped studio with a green screen and drone, and the digital art class works with industry-standard software, including Cinema 4D. Examples of the work undertaken in these classes can be seen in the new course guide.

For more information go to https://claremontcollege.education.tas.edu.au/

*Sharon Reibel is assistant principal of Claremont College

 

 

 

Catchups and a cuppa despite the cold

The pram group starting at tagari lia is a regular Thursday morning activity.
The pram group starting at tagari lia is a regular Thursday morning activity.

SINCE the lifting of COVID-19 restrictions tagari lia is starting to re-introduce programs and activities.

Drop in and Play is still not able to occur due to the need for physical distance.  All programs need to be booked and this can be done on Facebook or by phoning the Centre on 6165 5450.

Thursday mornings at 10am a pram walk leaves from the Centre followed by a cup of tea and a chat.  The weather has been crisp and cold but it is great to finally be able to be outdoors, connecting, chatting and catching up.

 

Worm farms a good way to foster waste reduction

 

By RICHARD CUSKELLY*

TONNES of avoidable food waste goes to landfill every day, which can present a financial loss for households as well as a negative environmental impact. Because of the way food waste breaks down in landfill it can create methane – a harmful greenhouse gas. A fun and effective way to reduce your waste is to feed your food scraps to a worm farm. The waste the worms produce (called ‘castings’) is rich in nutrients and great for feeding house plants, adding to seedling mixes and potting soils or top-dressing around veggies.

Starting a worm farm is a fantastic way to start fostering a child's responsibility and environmental conscience
Starting a worm farm is a fantastic way to start fostering a child’s responsibility and environmental conscience

Continue reading “Worm farms a good way to foster waste reduction”

Child and family centre celebrates birthday

By MARGIE NOLAN*

IT was our sixth birthday on early in July and we had plenty of fun celebrating. Children were welcomed by our Aboriginal community, and we sang and danced together.  Michelle from Make Believe also came along to make some fun music and to sing and play with the children. This year we had six delicious cakes too! Thank you to the many families who came to join us with our celebrations. We had a great birthday.

• Charlotte enjoys playing with the toys
• Charlotte enjoys playing with the toys

NAIDOC week followed and was another wonderful week of celebrations. This year’s NAIDOC theme, Because Of Her, We Can!, was embraced by Aboriginal communities around the nation. At tagari lia, Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal friends joined to celebrate and share traditional culture and knowledge. One memorable moment for the children, was to learn that painting is such a beautiful way of sharing stories for Aboriginal people.

Children painted our cave in the sandpit, learnt to twine, listened to the didgeridoo animal sounds, made up animal adventures and sang a baby lullaby based on the theme of “Because Of Her, We Can!”

The food was magnificent and included delights from our bush food garden, and gourmet mutton birds and wallaby provided by volunteer chef, Stuart, and his team. Many thanks to everyone who contributed and joined is us in our celebrations.

*Margie Nolan is the centre leader of tagari lia

 

Beating family mealtime blues

By ALISON WARD*

ARE you finding mealtimes a struggle, spending more time worrying about what the kids eat than eating your own meal?

Here are some tips to reduce the mealtime blues and put a bit of joy back into family mealtimes.

And, if you don’t have family meals maybe these tips will help get you started.Beating mealtime blues

Despite the effort, it’s a lot easier to start a family mealtime habit when children are young, but it’s never too late to start.

It doesn’t matter if it’s not every meal or even every day, or if not all the family are there. You don’t even need a table – a family meal can be anywhere you’re sitting and eating. Continue reading “Beating family mealtime blues”