College courses a pathway to university

By SHARON REIBEL*

CHOOSING the right subjects for Years 11 and 12 has never been easier.

‘Step into your future’ is Claremont College’s key message for students as they approach senior secondary education. To ensure students can make informed decisions about their courses in years 11 and 12, Claremont College has developed a new online course and enrolment information space on its website.

Apart from the many subjects on offer, the site highlights opportunities available to students if they choose to study a particular course. This may be working in the college’s highly regarded music program with tutors who are experienced performers, or the chance to perform in one of the college bands at MONA.

• Claremont College uniHUB co-coordinator Dr Jo Ingram assists a student with information about the University of Tasmania.
• Claremont College uniHUB co-coordinator Dr Jo Ingram assists a student with information about the University of Tasmania.

The online guide has profiles of alumni who have gone on to complete apprenticeships, university degrees or excel in research or sport.

Information on the uniHUB on the college campus, the only one in southern Tasmania, is available in the new online guide allowing  students to access UTAS. Students can get advice and assistance on pathways to university study, as well as study support and advice.

A careers centre assists students determining pathways, accessing career and job information, writing applications and resumes, and interview practice. They can be accessed virtually by students currently at college and those planning their Year 11 program in 2021.

The new Claremont College Academic pathways program mentors and supports students on a university pathway. It inspires students to aim high, through community engagement and a series of targeted activities, as well as builds confidence and develops strategies for successful academic study.

Claremont College has an excellent Vocational Education and Training (VET) program managed by experienced staff with long-standing employer networks.  Claremont was the first college to offer Electrotechnology VET in Tasmania and the first in Australia to offer the Australian Defence Forces (ADF) VET program, which is in its 15th year providing a direct pathway into the ADF for many graduates. Certificate II in animal studies, introduced this year, can provide a pathway to work and/or study in the animal care and management industry such as veterinary nursing,

The College offers a number of specific industry-focused Tasmanian Assessment Standards and Certification courses supported by new facilities and equipment. In the agricultural enterprise class, students can run their own real-life agricultural enterprises, including seedling production, egg production and the raising of chickens and piglets. The media production class uses a fully equipped studio with a green screen and drone, and the digital art class works with industry-standard software, including Cinema 4D. Examples of the work undertaken in these classes can be seen in the new course guide.

For more information go to https://claremontcollege.education.tas.edu.au/

*Sharon Reibel is assistant principal of Claremont College

 

 

 

Catchups and a cuppa despite the cold

The pram group starting at tagari lia is a regular Thursday morning activity.
The pram group starting at tagari lia is a regular Thursday morning activity.

SINCE the lifting of COVID-19 restrictions tagari lia is starting to re-introduce programs and activities.

Drop in and Play is still not able to occur due to the need for physical distance.  All programs need to be booked and this can be done on Facebook or by phoning the Centre on 6165 5450.

Thursday mornings at 10am a pram walk leaves from the Centre followed by a cup of tea and a chat.  The weather has been crisp and cold but it is great to finally be able to be outdoors, connecting, chatting and catching up.

 

Worm farms a good way to foster waste reduction

 

By RICHARD CUSKELLY*

TONNES of avoidable food waste goes to landfill every day, which can present a financial loss for households as well as a negative environmental impact. Because of the way food waste breaks down in landfill it can create methane – a harmful greenhouse gas. A fun and effective way to reduce your waste is to feed your food scraps to a worm farm. The waste the worms produce (called ‘castings’) is rich in nutrients and great for feeding house plants, adding to seedling mixes and potting soils or top-dressing around veggies.

Starting a worm farm is a fantastic way to start fostering a child's responsibility and environmental conscience
Starting a worm farm is a fantastic way to start fostering a child’s responsibility and environmental conscience

Continue reading “Worm farms a good way to foster waste reduction”

Child and family centre celebrates birthday

By MARGIE NOLAN*

IT was our sixth birthday on early in July and we had plenty of fun celebrating. Children were welcomed by our Aboriginal community, and we sang and danced together.  Michelle from Make Believe also came along to make some fun music and to sing and play with the children. This year we had six delicious cakes too! Thank you to the many families who came to join us with our celebrations. We had a great birthday.

• Charlotte enjoys playing with the toys
• Charlotte enjoys playing with the toys

NAIDOC week followed and was another wonderful week of celebrations. This year’s NAIDOC theme, Because Of Her, We Can!, was embraced by Aboriginal communities around the nation. At tagari lia, Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal friends joined to celebrate and share traditional culture and knowledge. One memorable moment for the children, was to learn that painting is such a beautiful way of sharing stories for Aboriginal people.

Children painted our cave in the sandpit, learnt to twine, listened to the didgeridoo animal sounds, made up animal adventures and sang a baby lullaby based on the theme of “Because Of Her, We Can!”

The food was magnificent and included delights from our bush food garden, and gourmet mutton birds and wallaby provided by volunteer chef, Stuart, and his team. Many thanks to everyone who contributed and joined is us in our celebrations.

*Margie Nolan is the centre leader of tagari lia

 

Beating family mealtime blues

By ALISON WARD*

ARE you finding mealtimes a struggle, spending more time worrying about what the kids eat than eating your own meal?

Here are some tips to reduce the mealtime blues and put a bit of joy back into family mealtimes.

And, if you don’t have family meals maybe these tips will help get you started.Beating mealtime blues

Despite the effort, it’s a lot easier to start a family mealtime habit when children are young, but it’s never too late to start.

It doesn’t matter if it’s not every meal or even every day, or if not all the family are there. You don’t even need a table – a family meal can be anywhere you’re sitting and eating. Continue reading “Beating family mealtime blues”

Teacher nominated for prestigious  award

JORDAN River Learning Federation Senior School is proud one of its staff has been nominated for Tasmanian Young Achiever Awards.

The awards aim to acknowledge, encourage and most importantly promote the positive achievements of all young people up to and including 29 years of age as of December 31 each year.

 

Dannica Green has been nominated for the University of Tasmania, Faculty of Education Teaching Excellence Award.
Dannica Green has been nominated for the University of Tasmania, Faculty of Education Teaching Excellence Award.

Continue reading “Teacher nominated for prestigious  award”

JRLF students nominated for state training awards

FOUR Year 11 and 12 students from Jordan River Senior School, have been proudly nominated for the Tasmanian Training Awards for 2016.

The awards are conducted annually by Skills Tasmania. The Awards recognise the achievements of apprentices, trainees and vocational students who strive for the highest standards of knowledge and skills within their industry. Continue reading “JRLF students nominated for state training awards”

School farm students show their shearing skills

TASMANIAN shearing trainer Jack Monks and Australian champion wool handler Mel Smith were at the Jordan River school farm last month to work with the VET agriculture students for a basic introduction to shearing.

They also worked with some grade 9 and 10s who are training to enter the Junior Wool Handling Competition at Campbell Town in June.

The students who took part included  Jordan River farm students Bradley Smith, Eliza Schofield, Jacob Swan, Jake Bryant, Kyle Spangler, Maddie Haigh, Sam Kemp, Stephany McManus and William McSherry.
The students who took part included Jordan River farm students Bradley Smith, Eliza Schofield, Jacob Swan, Jake Bryant, Kyle Spangler, Maddie Haigh, Sam Kemp, Stephany McManus and William McSherry.

Continue reading “School farm students show their shearing skills”

Learning centre receives major funding for new fit out

 

A BRIDGEWATER early learning centre development fitout has been given the go ahead with funding from a Federal Government initiative to create jobs and investment.

Federal Member for Lyons Eric Hutchinson said the Tasmanian Jobs and Investment Fund package was designed to stimulate local economies and create employment. Continue reading “Learning centre receives major funding for new fit out”